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Pixel Watch 2 Is Going To Be So Sweet

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First generation Google products. I wouldn’t say they always have issues, but many times, they have issues. This isn’t purely a Google thing either, but a tech industry thing in general. A lot of times, products need an iteration or two following the initial launch to really get dialed in. I’m not saying this will be the case for the upcoming Pixel Watch, but it’s probably going to be the case for the Pixel Watch.

There’s a general excitement surrounding the Pixel Watch, though, the reports and leaks regarding the device haven’t exactly helped it. Google has yet to confirm many of the specs for the device, leaving us with only rumors. One of those rumors is the inclusion of the 4-year old Exynos 9110, the same chip first found in the Galaxy Watch. Frankly, that news was rather alarming when it first hit the web. However, according to a newer report, that Exynos 9110 will be coupled with a co-processor that should help create a better smartwatch experience. Does that change the possible fact that we have a 4-year old chip powering this wearable? Not in the slightest.

Google Pixel Watch - on wrist

It seems possible that Google will discuss the creation and development of this device once it is launched which would provide insight into why they chose the 9110, but for a second iteration, I would expect Google to use newer silicon. When folks are spending their hard earned money, they probably want the latest and great components. If the Pixel Watch launches with performance issues, expect Pixel Watch 2 to address them.

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On maybe a more personal note, I think the proprietary band system for the Pixel Watch is a horrible idea. I’m going to go out on a big limb and predict that Google goes to a standard quick release band design with the Pixel Watch 2. The reason I don’t care for the Pixel Watch’s band system is quite simple and it comes down to options. It’s already been reported that Google will offer plenty of options for buyers, but incorporating a quick release system with lugs on the device opens up the options from tens (maybe hundreds) to literally thousands. Anytime we have a proprietary system with accessory makers having to create specialized products means consumers are going to have to spend more money. It’s not user friendly and it’s a very Apple way of thinking, something I think Google should always try to avoid. We want this watch accessible and capable of extending one’s personality to the wrist. That’s much easier when we allow owners to change out their straps to whatever they want, not possible with a proprietary system.


We don’t know what sort of improvements Google will need to make year-over-year until we have the Pixel Watch on our wrist. That being said, it’s always a reasonable bet that a first-gen product like this will launch with bugs or something that needs to be tweaked. I don’t think I’ll be prepared to offer a true verdict on this device until Google has time to issue a few software updates and provide necessary software tune-ups. If you’re someone who relies heavily on the first wave of product reviews, I’d urge you to remain calm, even if reviewers are unhappy with the device. Give Google some time to work out any kicks, that is, if there are any. It’s always possible Google releases this thing and it’s flawless, but c’mon, this is Google we’re talking about.

With all of this said, I’ll be buying a Pixel Watch as soon as they’re up for pre-order and I hope it’s everything we’ve been waiting for. I’m remaining optimistic, but I’m also a realist who has been in this industry long enough to know how this sort of thing usually pans out.



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Did You Order a Galaxy Z Flip 4 or Galaxy Z Fold 4?

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Pre-orders are taking place for the new Galaxy Z Flip 4 and Galaxy Z Fold 4, and as we always say, there’s never a better time to order one of these phones than during this period. Seriously, you should do it.

If you have taken advantage of Samsung’s crazy-good trade-in values, store credit and free accessories, the last thing we want to know is which model you ended up going with. In 2022, both are very good options, seen as relatively minor upgrades over last year’s models, but still offering top specs, water resistance, improved hinge designs for more compact designs, and improved software.

I have been using the Z Fold 4 for a week now and have really been enjoying the experience. The battery life has been great, the displays are nice, and the cameras appear to be very good.

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Which option are you going with?

Best Galaxy Z Flip 4 Deal | Best Galaxy Z Fold 4 Deal



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How Good is Android 13 on Pixel Phones?

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The stable Android 13 update has been out since the beginning of the week and that means a couple of days for you to run it and establish first impressions. I’m curious what those are, as the update is somewhat minor in new features, but huge in terms of bug fixes from Android 12.

To recap, Android 13 dropped on Monday for the Pixel 4, Pixel 4a, Pixel 5, Pixel 5a, Pixel 6, and Pixel 6a. The update was available immediately if you felt like playing in adb, plus we’ve seen it rollout over-the-air as well to some phones. Tim, for example, says he can pull it yet I can’t on my Pixel 6 Pro. Rude, Google.

We talked about all of the new features in Android 13 that you’ll want to be on the lookout for and then spent a lengthy amount of time looking through the list of 150 bugs that Google fixed. Google says it was able to improve “performance, stability, and reliability,” fixed bugs related to charging and Gboard and touch screen palm detection and so much more. Google even says it addressed fingerprint reader performance on the Pixel 6 and Pixel 6a.

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After browsing through reddit, I can see that a number of folks have been quick to share that their fingerprint reader is indeed faster (Do people really believe this?) and that overall performance and stuttering has improved, especially on older Pixel phones.

What about you? How has Android 13 been running on your Pixel phone this week? Or are you still waiting for it?



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Pixel 7 and Pixel 7 Pro Get Major Approval Ahead of Launch

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The Pixel 7 and Pixel 7 Pro stopped through the FCC this week, marking a big step towards launch that should happen around October, if previous launches are any indicator. The filings don’t reveal much, other than supported network bands and the presence of UWB again, but they do give us model numbers to pin on each phone going forward.

There are four FCC filings of note to dip into under Google’s FCC ID. Those filings give us model numbers of GVU6C, GQML3, GP4BC, and GE2AE. After looking through several of the documents at the FCC, I’m pretty confident in saying that the first two are the Pixel 7 and the last two are the Pixel 7 Pro. The GVU6C Pixel 7 also has an alternate model number of G03Z5 alongside it, as does the Pixel 7 Pro’s GE2AE, where GFE4J can be added to its list.

To recap, we have Pixel 7 and Pixel 7 Pro model numbers as follows:

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  • PIXEL 7: GVU6C (G03Z5)
  • PIXEL 7: GQML3 – mmW
  • PIXEL 7 PRO: GP4BC – UWB
  • PIXEL 7 PRO: GE2AE (GFE4J) – UWB, mmW

Each phone has all of the proper network bands to work well here in the US, with select models also supporting 5G mmW. The two models supporting mmW are GQML3 (Pixel 7) and GE2AE (Pixel 7 Pro). The others support sub-6 5G, just not the super speedy 5G mmW that you’ll never attach to anyway.

To tell the difference between Pixel 7 and Pixel 7 Pro devices, we really are guessing (assuming) based on the fact that GP4BC and GE2AE have UWB or ultra-wideband support. In the Pixel 6 and Pixel 6 Pro, only the Pixel 6 Pro had UWB and it looks like that’ll be the case again this year. UWB is used for short-range communications in things like luggage trackers or to help a digital car key talk to a car.

The rest of the big network stuff can be see below, where you’ll find WiFi 6E, NFC, and WPT (wireless power transfer aka wireless charging).

Pixel 7 network bands

GQML3 mmW

Pixel 7 Pro network bands

GE2AE mmW

There isn’t much else to take from this because Google already announced each phone. We’re really just waiting for them to go official, so that we can start playing with their cameras, test Google Tensor 2, and see if Google took are of all of the Pixel 6 line’s modem issues.

If you were hoping this arrival at the FCC would tell us when the Pixel 7 will launch, I’m not sure that it does. The Pixel 6 line hit the FCC in September 2021 and then arrived in October. The Pixel 6a showed up at the FCC in April 2022, was announced in May, and then didn’t ship until July.

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