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DJI Mini 3 Pro Drone With 60fps 4K Video Support, 34-Minute Flight-Time Launched: All Details

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DJI Mini 3 Pro Drone With 60fps 4K Video Support, 34-Minute Flight-Time Launched: All Details

DJI Mini 3 Pro has been unveiled as the latest addition to the DJI’s Mini Drones lineup. The new lightweight and portable camera drone weighs less than 249 grams and can fly for a maximum time of 34 minutes. The drone offers more built-in features along with better flight and camera performance than its predecessors, the Mini 2, Mavic Mini, and Mini SE, the company claims. Launched in November 2020, DJI Mini 2 could only record up to 30 frames per second 4K resolution videos. In DJI Mini 3 Pro, the company has upgraded the drone’s video recording capabilities to up to 60 frames per second 4K resolutions videos. DJI has also launched its new remote controller called the DJI RC. The new controller comes with a 5.5-inch built-in touchscreen which eliminates the need of a smartphone to be attached to the controller. The controller comes preloaded with DJI Fly application.

DJI Mini 3 Pro, RC price and availability

DJI’s new mini drone is available for pre-order in US on DJI’s website. The price of the drone start from $699 (roughly Rs. 54,000) for DJI Mini 3 Pro without a remote controller and is compatible with the previous generation drones’ RC-N1 remote controllers. The price of the drone bundled with the RC-N1 controller rises to $759 (roughly Rs. 58,600). DJI Mini 3 Pro with company’s latest touchscreen controller DJI RC will cost $909 (roughly Rs. 70,200).

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The company expects to start shipping the product by late-May. There is no information on the international availability or pricing of the DJI Mini 3 Pro.

DJI Mini 3 Pro Specifications

DJI’s latest addition to the Mini Drone lineup can record 4K resolution videos at 60 frames per second. The drone can fly for a maximum time of 34 minutes and weighs under 249 grams. The DJI Mini 2 had a maximum flight time of 31 minutes.

To bridge the gap between features of DJI’s bigger Air, Mavic series and DJI’s smaller Mini Drone lineup, company has included the intelligent capturing modes in the Mini 3 Pro. The drone sports a 1/1.3-inch CMOS camera sensor with f/1.7 aperture and take images of up to 48-megapixel. The camera can rotate 90 degrees for better vertical shooting.

The DJI Mini 3 Pro comes with an extend flight battery option as well that extends the maximum flight time to 47 minutes. The drone also comes with the O3 transmission system that delivers 1080p live feed from a distance of up to 12km.

The new drone comes with dual-vision sensors on the front and back for a safer flight and a redesigned gimbal. The Mini 3 Pro also features Tri-Directional Obstacle Sensing. The forward, backward, and downward visual sensors enable the Advanced Pilot Assistance Systems (APAS) 4.0 that helps the drone determine safer paths.

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DJI Mini 3 Pro brings a lot of features for the size of the drone over its predecessors. The newly added sensors make the DJI Mini 3 Pro the first drone in the Mini Drone lineup to integrate APAS and FocusTrack. DJI started the Mini Drone lineup with the DJI Mavic Mini in October 2019 and has launched four drones in the lineup since Mavic Mini’s launch.


How will India’s new liberalised drone rules impact the industry? And where are they left wanting? We discussed this on Orbital, the Gadgets 360 podcast. Orbital is available on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon Music and wherever you get your podcasts.

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Centre Says Private Players Can Use Drones for Delivery Purposes Under Drone Rules 2021

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Centre Says Private Players Can Use Drones for Delivery Purposes Under Drone Rules 2021

Private players are free to use drones for delivery purposes subject to compliance with Drone Rules, 2021, informed Minister of State for Civil Aviation General VK Singh (Retd) in Rajya Sabha on Monday. According to the Ministry of Civil Aviation, in a written reply to a question asked about drone services for private players in Rajya Sabha, Singh said, “Drones offer tremendous benefits to almost all sectors of the economy. These include agriculture, vaccine delivery, surveillance, search and rescue, transportation, mapping, defence and law enforcement to name a few.”

“The Government is utilising services of drone service providers for vaccine delivery, inspection of oil pipelines and power transmission lines, anti-locust operations, agricultural spraying, the survey of mines, land mapping under SVAMITVA scheme for issuance of digital property cards, etc. Many of these have been in remote areas of the country. Private players are free to use drones for delivery purposes subject to compliance with Drone Rules, 2021,” he said.

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The Union Minister further said that last year in September the Government notified the Production-Linked Incentive (PLI) scheme to promote the growth of drone manufacturing by private companies.

“The scheme provides for an incentive of Rs 120 crores, spread over three financial years. The PLI rate is 20 percent of the value addition over three financial years. PLI for a manufacturer shall be capped at 25 percent of the total annual outlay. A provisional list of 23 PLI beneficiaries was released on July 6, 2022. The beneficiaries include 12 manufacturers of drones and 11 manufacturers of drone components,” Singh said.

He said that the Drones Rules, 2021 notified on August 25, 2021, provide the necessary regulatory framework for the commercial use of drones. These rules cover various aspects like type certification, registration and operation of drones, airspace restrictions, research, development and testing of drones, training and licensing, offences and penalties etc.

The key aspects of the regulatory framework under Drones Rules, 2021:

  1. Every drone, except for those meant for research, development and testing purposes, is required to be registered and should have a Unique Identification Number (UIN).
  2. An airspace map of the country segregating the entire airspace into red, yellow and green zones is available on the digital sky platform. The operation of drones in red and yellow zones is subject to the approval of the Central Government and the concerned Air Traffic Control (ATC) authority respectively. No approval is required for the operation of drones in green zones.
  3. The State Government, the Union Territory Administration and Law enforcement agencies have been empowered under the Rules to declare a temporary red zone for a specified period.
  4. Drones are required to have the necessary type certification issued by the Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA). No type certification is however required in the case of nano drones (up to 250 gram all-up weight) and model drones made for research and recreation purposes.
  5. The owner and operators of drones are required to furnish the necessary personal details including their Indian passport number etc. for issuance of any registration or licence.
  6. Rule 17 of the Drone Rules, 2021, lays down the provision of transfer of a drone to another person by way of sale, lease, gift or any other mode, after providing requisite details of the transferor, transferee and unique identification number of the drone on the digital sky platform along with the applicable fees.
  7. Authorisation of Remote Pilot Training Organisations (RPTO) will be done by DGCA within specified time limits.
  8. Drone operations that violate the provisions of the Drone Rules, 2021 are punishable under Rule 49 of the Drone Rules, 2021 as well as provisions of any other law, for the time being in force.

Is Pixel 6a the best camera phone under Rs. 50,000? We discuss this on Orbital, the Gadgets 360 podcast. Orbital is available on Spotify, Gaana, JioSaavn, Google Podcasts, Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music and wherever you get your podcasts.

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Centre Undertakes Series of Reform Measures to Make India Global Drone Hub by 2030, MoS Civil Aviation Says

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The government has undertaken a series of reform measures to make India a global drone hub by 2030, Minister of State for Civil Aviation VK Singh told the Rajya Sabha on Monday.

Giving a written reply to a query raised by Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) MP Narhari Amin, the Minister further said some of the reform measures taken up by the government in this direction include the step to notify Liberalised Drone Rules, 2021 on August 25 last year.

Drone Airspace Map was published on September 24 last year, opening up nearly 90 percent of Indian airspace as a green zone for drones flying up to 400 feet, said Singh.

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Production-Linked Incentive (PLI) scheme for drones was also notified on September 30 last year as well as UAS Traffic Management (UTM) Policy Framework was published on October 24 last year,” said the Minister.

A monetary grant programme for the purchase of agricultural drones was announced by the Union Agriculture Ministry on January 22 this year, and all application forms under Drone Rules, 2021 were also made online on the Digital Sky Platform on January 26.

Singh said that the drone certification scheme was notified on January 26 this year and the mission “Drone Shakti” was also announced for supporting drone startups and promoting Drone-as-a-Service (DrAAS) as part of the Union Budget on February 1.

Besides, the drone import policy was notified on February 9, banning the import of foreign drones and freeing up the import of drone components.

He further mentioned that Drone (Amendment) Rules, 2022 was notified on February 11, abolishing the requirement of a drone pilot licence. Now a remote pilot certificate is issued by a Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) authorised Remote Pilot Training Organisations (RPTO) which is adequate for the remote pilot to operate drones.

Giving details of the Drones Rules, 2021 notified on August 25 last year, the Minister said it provides the necessary regulatory framework for the civilian or commercial use of drones.

These rules cover various aspects like type certification, registration and operation of drones, airspace restrictions, research, development and testing of drones, training and licensing, offences and penalties, said Singh.

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Given salient features of the Drones Rules, 2021, the Minister said every drone, except for those meant for research, development and testing purposes, is required to be registered and should have a Unique Identification Number (UIN).

“An airspace map of the country segregating the entire airspace into red, yellow and green zones is available on the digital sky platform. The operation of drones in red and yellow zones is subject to the approval of the Central Government and the concerned Air Traffic Control (ATC) authority respectively. No approval is required for the operation of drones in green zones,” the Ministry said.

He said drones are required to have the necessary type certification issued by the DGCA, and that no type certification is however required in case of nano drones (up to 250 gram all-up weight) and model drones made for research and recreation purposes.

The Minister said the owner and operators of drones are required to furnish the necessary personal details including their Indian passport number for issuance of any registration or licence.

“Authorisation of RPTO will be done by DGCA within specified time limits,” said Singh.

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As of July 20, there were 27 RPTOs authorised by DGCA. Of these, three RPTOs are located in Gujarat– Blue Ray Aviation, Kaushalya- The Skill University and Sanskardham Drone Academy.


How will India’s new liberalised drone rules impact the industry? And where are they left wanting? We discussed this on Orbital, the Gadgets 360 podcast. Orbital is available on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon Music and wherever you get your podcasts.

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Syngenta Starts 10,000km ‘Drone Yatra’ Across 13 States to Educate Farmers on Spraying Pesticides With Drones

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Swiss agrochemical major Syngenta on Friday started a ‘drone yatra’ of 10,000 km in India to educate farmers on pesticide spraying using drones across 13 states in the next three months. The company also announced the world’s first biodiversity sensor technology, developed in partnership with IIT Ropar in Punjab and Fraunhofer Institute of Germany to measure biodiversity in Agri landscapes and suggest farmers on cultivating appropriate crops.

This sensor will be tested in farmers’ fields in Europe and India this year.

Digital technologies are going to be the next big driver of agriculture.

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By the end of this month, the company said it is also planning to launch the Grower app in India to empower small holding farmers by giving them digital agronomy advice on nine crops — including cotton, wheat, vegetables, rice and maize — in multiple languages.

Syngenta India Country Head and Managing Director Susheel Kumar and Syngenta Group Chief Information and Digital Officer Feroz Sheikh — announced the new initiatives here.

“The drone yatra aims to create awareness about the use of drones in agriculture. A van will be deployed that will travel across the country covering 10,000 km reaching out to 10,000 farmers,” Kumar said after flagging off the Drone Yatra. The van will kick start from Maharashtra and travel to Madhya Pradesh, Gujarat, Rajasthan, Punjab, Haryana, Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, West Bengal, Odisha, Telangana, Andhra Pradesh, and Karnataka, he said.

The commercial launch of the drones for pesticide spraying will be done later this month in three crops — rice, cotton and soybean, he added.

Syngenta is the first private firm that has received approval from Central Insecticide Board (CIB) to use drones for spraying its crop protection product ‘Amistar’ on paddy to protect the crops against fungal infections — Blast and Sheath Blight.

Till last year, the government was allowing drones in agriculture one by one after the submission of data. However, early this year, it started giving ad hoc permission for two years for spraying any molecules except herbicides.

Syngenta has already tested the efficacy of drones, Kumar said, adding that the awareness drive through Drone Yatra will not only educate farmers about the new technology but also help the company to take feedback and inputs from farmers and based on that improvise drone spray services in future.

Further advanced features in drones like precision application will be brought in future, Sheikh said, adding that “we are working on taking measurements of soil inch by inch and predict where weeds are placed and spray herbicides accordingly”.

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Besides drones, Sheikh said, the company has developed biodiversity sensor technology in partnership with the IIT Ropar, Fraunhofer Institute in Germany, and some start-ups. There is no objective data available at present in the world on biodiversity status in agricultural landscapes.

“There is no data available objectively on how much is biodiversity i.e. different species like butterflies and insects in farmland and how can we help to improve biodiversity in a particular region. From a sustainability perspective, we decided to fill the gap of data,” he said.

The sensors, which will measure the biodiversity in agri-landscapes using AI, have already been tested and validated the accuracy of algorithms. Now, it will be tested in farmers’ fields in all of Europe and India before making it an open resource, Sheikh told PTI. “We are now starting the process of putting the sensors out in the field to see if it is working well enough and then take a decision to make is open,” he said, adding this technology has been developed to solve the problem for the greater good and the company has decided to open the data and code of this application.

Syngenta will manufacture and deploy 50 sensors this year. Out of which, about a dozen or so will be deployed by the end of this year, Sheikh said.

“The reason to make the data open is that Syngenta needs to manufacture sensors for everybody and other companies manufacturing hardware can take the blueprint and manufacture sensors,” he added.

Outlining other India-centric innovations, Syngenta India Country Head and Managing Director Susheel Kumar announced it will launch a ‘Grower App’ for free to farmers by July end.

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Grower App aims to give digital agronomy advice for nine crops, including cotton, wheat, vegetables, rice and maize in multiple languages. It is a unique app, which digitally empowers smallholders, he said.

The app is built using the ‘Cropwise technology platform, and tailored to India, Sheikh said, adding “with that, we are bringing our global innovation in Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning to create benefits for the Indian farmers. Our target is to reach 2,50,000 farmers this year and next year one million farmers”.

According to Syngenta, the app is working on including satellite imagery for the identification of crop stress, a stress indicator model as every crop needs a particular weather requirement at its different crop growth stages.

Apart from biodiversity sensors, IIT Ropar Associate Dean (R&D) Pushpendra Ropa said the institute has also developed a device to record ambient temperature called ‘Ambitech’ that can help keep the log of temperature in cold chain logistics, especially perishable commodities like dairy and meat.

It has received certification for Ambitech and will be priced at Rs 230 for the Indian market. It is a passive device that helps record ambient temperature of minus 40 to 80 degrees Celsius, he said.

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IIT Ropar is also working on a ‘Livestock Monitoring Device’ in partnership with Syngenta.

Syngenta, which is currently owned by Chinese state-owned enterprise ChemChina, has been investing $1.4 billion (roughly Rs. 11,200 crore) a year in R&D, and about 6,500 employees working in R&D globally.

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