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App Tracking Transparency

Snap hit by Apple’s App Tracking Transparency as ad revenue falls

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With iOS 14.5, Apple introduced a new feature called ‘App Tracking Transparency’ that limited developers and advertisers from showing targeted ads to the users. It limited them from collecting data about the users’ app usage and showing ads based on it. Following the controversial move, companies like Facebook, Twitter, and Snap predicted that their ad revenue will fall.

Now, Snap — the company which developed Snapchat — has announced that has missed its ad revenue target by nearly $3 million in the third quarter of 2021. Even though the company crossed $1 billion in revenue, and added more than 13 million daily users, Snap doesn’t look happy.

A more significant impact on our business than we had expected.

Though it hasn’t missed the target by much, Snap “expects” the impact to continue next quarter and in the long-term have a large effect.

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In a statement, Snap’s chief business officer, Jeremi Gorman, said, “We grappled with industry changes to the way advertising is targeted, optimized, and measured on iOS that created a more significant impact on our business than we had expected.” In addition, Gorman says that Apple’s new SKAdNetwork (SKAN) solution hasn’t performed as expected.

“The initial results we observed using SKAN were generally aligned with prior industry-standard solutions, and we were among the first platforms to lean into this solution and push for widespread industry adoption. However, over time, we saw SKAN measurement results diverge meaningfully from the results we observed on other first and third-party measurement solutions, making SKAN unreliable as a standalone measurement solution,” said Gorman.

This “might be a preview of what’s coming,” reports The Verge. Twitter and Facebook are hosting their earnings call next week, and we might see similar results there as well. Snap, on its part, though, has started developing its own tool for advertisers called Advanced Conversations. The company says it is under development and “will take time to be fully adopted.”

Via: The Verge




An engineer by degree, news reporter by profession, and an avid sports lover. You’ll find me scrolling Football Twitter when I’m not writing about cutting-edge technology. Have a tip? Noted a mistake? You can reach out using the email given below.

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App Tracking Transparency

First FaceBook, Now Twitter Bothering Users With App Tracking

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With the release of iOS 14.5, Apple enforced the App Tracking Transparency norms that make it mandatory for all apps to ask users for their permission before tracking them. This tracking is what allows companies to serve users targeted ads while filling their coffers with millions of dollars in ad money. Facebook opposed it vehemently, and once it was implemented, it started telling users that ad tracking is what keeps Facebook and Instagram free. Well, Twitter has now also started asking users to enable ad tracking, but in a more polite manner.

The real question is – How relevant are the promoted posts and ads you see on Twitter?

The latest build of Twitter for iOS (v8.65) now shows a splash screen, telling users that the ads they see on its social media platform will be more relevant if they enable ad tracking. Pretty obvious, right? After all, that’s the whole purpose of tracking the activity of users across apps and the internet. However, the ground reality is a tad less optimistic. A healthy number of promoted posts I see on Twitter tend to incline towards sensationalism, while the ads I see have a hit-or-miss record. On the positive side though, I’ve often found myself clicking on them.

At the end of the day, it depends on how conscious (or paranoid) you’re about your privacy and whether you want a social media giant to log your internet activity. If history is any indication, these companies – especially Facebook – don’t have a very good track record when it comes to protecting the data they’ve collected. Remember the Facebook-Cambridge Analytica fiasco? However, if your business or line of work is predominantly driven by social media, there is a chance that the ads you see will give you a better idea of what the competition is up to, or the general direction in which the industry is headed.

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A majority of users are not okay with the idea of being tracked across the internet

Even if you’re a regular bloke who’s interested in a particular topic, some of the ads you see might just be the product you’ve been looking for. Did you really want that product, or a company just triggered a desire by showing it to you based on your internet activity? That’s an altogether different debate addressing whether a company is creating a solution or demand. However, most users are not too keen on being tracked. As per a recent Flurry Media report, merely 4% of users in the United States opted-in for being tracked by apps in the second week after iOS 14.5’s release.




I’ve been writing about consumer technology for over three years now, having worked with names such as NDTV and Beebom in the past. Aside from covering the latest news, I’ve reviewed my fair share of devices ranging from smartphones and laptops to smart home devices. I also have interviewed tech execs and appeared as a host in YouTube videos talking about the latest and greatest gadgets out there.

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App Tracking Transparency

Stats Prove Very few iPhone users opted-in to get tracked. Sorry Facebook…

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With the arrival of iOS 14.5, Apple introduced what is possibly the biggest change around privacy when it comes to apps listed on its app repository. Called App Tracking Transparency, its a framework that makes it mandatory for apps to ask iPhone users for permission in order to track them, a process that would allow ad-tracking. Or in simple works, serving them targeted ads. Well, it appears that the latest privacy policy change is having the effect many predicted – not many people are okay with being tracked!

As per insights collected by Flurry Media, merely 4% of users in the United States opted-in for being tracked by apps in the second week after iOS 14.5’s release. In the first week, that number stood even lower. In addition to it, barely 3% of users agreed to restricted app tracking, which means these apps cannot ask users to track them. On a worldwide scale, the daily opt-in rate for allowing ad-tracking by apps stands at approximately 12% in the second week following the release of iOS 14. 5 update. Just in case you’re wondering, the data is based after sampling roughly 2.5 million iPhone users.

So, what does it have to do with Facebook?

Well, Facebook posed the biggest challenge to Apple’s proposed move months ago, despite facing criticism from within. The company even launched a massive campaign that sent out the idea that the App Store changes have less to do with privacy and are more concerned with profits. Facebook even called Apple a competitor that is using its control over the entire ecosystem to stifle competition and choke their ad revenue. And on top of it, Facebook also came forward with another major campaign which claimed that Apple’s move will seriously hurt small businesses.

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Apple, on the other hand, was unwilling to budge and countered that users should have a choice whether they want to be served ads after being tracked. Following Facebook’s offensive, Apple even threatened that apps that don’t abide by the new App Store policies will risk getting kicked off from the app repository. Now that iOS 14.5 has enforced App Tracking Transparency framework and users are actually opting out of being tracked, Facebook (and Instagram) are sending signals that ad-tracking is what keeps these services free, and that they might be charged for using it in the near future.




I’ve been writing about consumer technology for over three years now, having worked with names such as NDTV and Beebom in the past. Aside from covering the latest news, I’ve reviewed my fair share of devices ranging from smartphones and laptops to smart home devices. I also have interviewed tech execs and appeared as a host in YouTube videos talking about the latest and greatest gadgets out there.

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