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Upcoming Qualcomm Snapdragon Wear 5100 can’t hold a candle to Samsung’s 5nm Exynos W920 chip [Report]

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Qualcomm’s upcoming chipset for wearables, the Snapdragon Wear 5100, was spotted recently. While the initial reports claimed it will be a massive upgrade over last year’s Wear 4100+, a new report suggests that this may not be the case. According to a report from WinFuture, Wear 5100 will not come with four ARM Cortex-A73 cores, instead, it’ll come with four ARM Cortex-A53 cores.

WinFuture’s findings are based on initial samples that were tested by Qualcomm, although the report doesn’t include details about the clock speed and fabrication technology. If this turns out to be true, though, Qualcomm’s upcoming smartwatch processor won’t be a big upgrade over the previous generation smartwatch processor as it was expected earlier.

The Wear 4100+ also shipped with ARM Cortex-A53 cores and was based on a 12nm node manufacturing process. In comparison to Samsung’s latest W920 chipset, which is based on a 5nm node manufacturing process, Qualcomm’s counterpart may lag behind a lot.

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However, Qualcomm may up its game in other areas. The report says the company is testing the chipset in various configurations that use 1GB or 2GB of LPDDR4X RAM and 8GB or 16GB of eMMC-based flash storage. In addition, the processor is reportedly being tested with cameras featuring 5MP and 16MP sensors. It’ll also host an ultra-low-power coprocessor to handle low-priority tasks like logging health data. Given these features, the Snapdragon 5100 may still perform on par with Samsung’s W920.

Qualcomm may announce the new Wear processor at its event later this month. There’s no word on when the first Snapdragon Wear 5100 smartwatches may hit the market.

    Samsung Galaxy Watch 4
    Check out Samsung’s latest Galaxy Watch 4 with feature like body fitness sensors, blood oxygen monitor, ECG monitor on Amazon.

Via: WinFuture




An engineer by degree, news reporter by profession, and an avid sports lover. You’ll find me scrolling Football Twitter when I’m not writing about cutting-edge technology. Have a tip? Noted a mistake? You can reach out using the email given below.

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Qualcomm announces new Snapdragon 480+ 5G, 680 4G, 695 5G, and 778G+ 5G SoCs

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Qualcomm today announced several new and upgraded chipsets, including the mid-range, Snapdragon 778 Plus 5G, Snapdragon 695 5G, the Snapdragon 680 4G, and the low-end Snapdragon 480 Plus 5G chipset. The company often refreshes its lineup of SoCs once a year, but it seems to have broken its tradition and done it slightly earlier for some of its products.

Qualcomm Snapdragon 778G Plus 5G

Much like the Snapdragon 778G, the new 778G Plus is based on the Kryo 670 CPU cores, but it can boost up to 2.5Ghz, instead of 2.4Ghz on the previous version. The new chipset also features the very same Adreno 642L GPU, which is supposed to provide up to 20% boost in performance. When it comes to AI capabilities and other connectivities, all specifications remain the same as the previous generation.

Qualcomm Snapdragon 695 5G

The new Snapdragon 695 5G is also based on its predecessor, the 690 that was unveiled back in June last year. The first most obvious upgrade is the 5G mmWave and sub-6Ghz 5G support, the second is that it’s 30% faster in graphics-related tasks. The CPU also received a 15% boost in performance compared to the previous model, and the chipset is based on the Kryo 660CPU cores that are clocked at 2.2Ghz. The GPU is Adreno 619.

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Qualcomm Snapdragon 680 4G

The new Snapdragon 680 4G SoC is new to the Qualcomm world and it’s built on the 6nm technology. The chipset is based on the Kryo 265 cores and features the Adreno 610 GPU. It’s mainly aimed at more affordable 4G compatible mobile devices, and it also has support for FHD+ and even a 90Hz refresh rate display.

Qualcomm Snapdragon 480 Plus 5G

The Snapdragon 480 Plus 5G will likely be the least powerful and cheapest SoC of the bunch that is shown here. It’s based on the 8nm process, and it features Qualcomm’s Kryo 460 CPU cored and the Adreno 619 GPU, although it is slightly upgraded and provides faster performance overall compared to its predecessor. This SoC is mainly designed for affordable 5G devices that will support FHD+ display with a peak refresh rate of 120Hz, and it even supports Qualcomm’s Quick Charge 4+.

The brand new Qualcomm Snapdragon chipsets will likely find a new home in new devices that’ll be coming out before the holidays and H1 of 2022. Brands such as Xiaomi, Oppo, Honor, HMD Global (Nokia) will likely equip their more affordable devices with these chips, so be on the lookout if you’re looking to upgrade.




Roland is a technology enthusiast and software engineer based in United Kingdom. He is also a content creator and writer, and is best known under the name “Techusiast”.

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Accessories

Nothing and Qualcomm announce a new partnership

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Nothing has debuted its first wireless earbuds in late July, and the company has shipped well over 100,000 products, which is very respectable from a brand new, fresh company without much reputation. Today, Nothing has announced that thanks to its first round of success, it will partner up with Qualcomm to “deliver richer, more immersive experiences” to Nothing’s customers.

This means that you should expect to see future Nothing products to use Snapdragon chips inside them and support more audio formats, and even potentially make pairing faster and easier across multiple devices. The company has also announced that it has received $50 million in Series A extension investments, meaning that the company is on the right track to develop even more products in the near future.

“The successful launch of our first product, ear (1), proved that there is room for a new challenger brand to emerge and disrupt today’s sea of sameness. Users deserve better products that are simpler to use, accessible, yet look amazing,” said Carl Pei, CEO and Co-founder of Nothing. “Seamless connectivity is paramount to achieving our vision of a future without barriers between people and technology. We look forward to working alongside Qualcomm Technologies and our strategic investors to achieve Nothing’s next phase of growth.”

“We are excited to help Nothing bring to life its highly anticipated ecosystem of tech products,” said Enrico Salvatori, senior vice-president and president, Qualcomm Europe/MEA, Qualcomm Europe, Inc. “By combining the power and efficiency of Snapdragon mobile platforms with 5G connectivity across many different categories of devices, we are fostering the development of innovative products that are intended to benefit consumers and deliver richer, more immersive experiences.”

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Qualcomm has recently announced its AptX Lossless Bluetooth audio codec, which will also likely be supported on future Nothing wireless earbuds, although we have no information, rumors, or any leaks on when they may arrive. 




Roland is a technology enthusiast and software engineer based in United Kingdom. He is also a content creator and writer, and is best known under the name “Techusiast”.

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How Artificial Intelligence makes your phone better (video & podcast)

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If you’ve been using smartphones for the past quinquennial or even more, you’ll understand exactly where this is coming from. I’m sorry, but if you’re on your first or second smartphone, you were already born into this to begin with.

You see, going back in time all the way to the Nokia 808 PureView, it was the phone that revolutionized smartphone photography. It was the first mobile device on the market with a whopping 40MP camera sensor. The Nokia Lumia 1020 followed, with the same size sensor and Zeiss lens.

The competition didn’t catch up for quite some time, but that the moment in time when the race for megapixels has started. Regardless of make or model, all smartphone manufacturers started cramming more and more megapixels into their offerings, up to a point where it all stopped.

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Qualcomm Sensing HUB

You see, how come a modern smartphone today can take better pictures with a 12MP sensor than one back in the day with a much larger sensor, or even a modern mirrorless camera? The answer is simple, but the technology is rather complicated: it’s because of AI (Artificial Intelligence).

We sat down with Ziad Asghar, Qualcomm‘s Vice President of Product Management to talk about how Artificial Intelligence makes your phone better, and in ways you might have not even suspected.

It’s not just photography, though that’s the most visible part of the impact on Artificial Intelligence for the average user in day to day usage. Whether it materializes in achieving and/or maintaining focus, distinguishing between subject (and objects), recognizing faces, identifying textures, setting the proper white balance and exposure, triggering HDR, taking several shots at different exposures and then stitching them together, you name it.

Yes, filters you use on your popular social media images also rely on AI to detect your face in order to apply those lovely effects…

Qualcomm’s flagship SoC, the Snapdragon 888 Plus, dubbed “the beast” internally, is so powerful that it can capture 120 12MP pictures within one single second, which is 2.6GP (gigapixels).

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artificial intelligence

Ai is also responsible for the little things you might not even notice, like detecting when you are driving and triggering different modes, or not allowing the user to do certain things while driving. Tell us in the comments below how many of you knew that Spotify switching to a driving mode was actually an AI-feature?

Even the simplest task on a smartphone, the one we use less and less, phone calls, greatly benefit from AI, in the way that your device captures audio, analyzes it, and reduces noise and echo.

Other applications include Natural Language Processing, whether that’s your phone being capable of understanding what you say and executing the commands, or just simply taking what you say and translating that in real time to another language so that you an be understood.

What’s even more impressive is what Qualcomm has done with the so called Sensing Hub, where the phone is constantly aware of its surroundings and can act accordingly, whether recognizing what the user is doing, or by simply having it laid down on the table. A great example Ziad talks about is having the phone on the table at night and it recognizing the sound of a child crying, to immediately alert someone of it.

There are many other things AI can do and Ziad talks about it at length. Without giving it all away, we encourage you to watch the video below or listen to the entire conversation to learn about all the things AI is responsible for, and how Qualcomm continuously strives to improve your user experience.

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Anton is the Editor-in-Chief of Pocketnow. As publication leader, he aims to bring Pocketnow even closer to you. His vision is mainly focused on, and oriented towards, the audience. Anton’s ambition, adopted by the entire team, is to transform Pocketnow into a reference media outlet.

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